Posts tagged with ‘malia obama’

Malia Obama is cracking me up. Gotta stay warm somehow. Why not get your groove on?

This is one of my favorite candid moments from yesterday’s festivities.

(Source: digg, via dynastylnoire)

Adorable, aren’t they? This photo was taken as the Obamas walked across Lafayette Park to Easter services at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C.
On the fashion front, this is the second consecutive year the first lady has worn a Thakoon dress on Easter Sunday.
Credits: Kristoffer Tripplaar-Pool/Getty Images

Adorable, aren’t they? This photo was taken as the Obamas walked across Lafayette Park to Easter services at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C.

On the fashion front, this is the second consecutive year the first lady has worn a Thakoon dress on Easter Sunday.

Credits: Kristoffer Tripplaar-Pool/Getty Images

Tall Tales

"Even though she’s 5’9", she’s still my baby," said President Obama during a speech in Kansas City, Mo. in July. He was referring to his eldest daughter, Malia, who’s just 13.

Judging by this photo of the first family taken during the taping of “Christmas in Washington,” Malia (on the far right) doesn’t appear self-conscious about her height. Attagirl!

I did the majority of my growing in eighth grade. I don’t know how many inches I gained that year, but I reached the height I am now (5’9”) by the end of it. At the time, I was not thrilled. 

I was outgrowing pants left and right. Plus, I was keenly aware that being tall made me stand out when I would have given anything to blend in.

Bless my eighth grade English teacher, though. She tried to get me to see my height as an asset. About once a week for the entire year I was in her class, Mrs. Mader would say to me “Melanie, you should be a model. You’re so tall and willowy.”

This baffled me. (Despite being tall and willowy, if you will, I did not consider myself model material. And I was an “A” English student!) But she said it so often that, looking back, I’m guessing she sensed my insecurity and tried to boost my confidence with a consistent “compliment.”

I think lots of kids need their egos boosted during adolescence, but I’m hoping Malia is as comfortable in her own skin as she seems. She’s in an unfortunate position. It’s got to be hell going through puberty in front of the world.

Nonetheless, Malia is carrying herself with poise. And, even though I doubt she’d admit it now, it probably helps to know she’s still daddy’s little girl.

~M.M.

P.S. On a related note…Amy Odell wrote a thoughtful post about why the first girls’ clothing choices shouldn’t be making news.

Photo: Reuters